Wine Prevents Cavities? | Wilmington Dentist

During the holiday season it is tough to keep all of our typical routines in check. Avoiding sugary sweets and regular brushing and flossing top the list of steps to take to avoid tooth decay, but other lifestyle habits, and even some foods and beverages, play a role in cavity prevention, too. Work some of these little tricks into your regular and pass those dental appointments with flying colors!

Cheese. Some researchers believe that casein, a protein found in cheese, may have a protective property that promotes healthy teeth and could help with cavity prevention.

Chewing gum. Chewing sugar-free gum has long been recommended to avoid cavities. And sugar-free gum made with xylitol, a natural sugar substitute, seems to be even more of a winner.

Wine. It may cause stains on your teeth, but one study suggests that many of the individual chemical components in both red and white wine can actively fight the bacteria that lead to tooth decay and cavities.

Raisins. Scientists have found that some of the chemicals present in raisins, including polyphenols and flavonoids, may actively fight oral bacteria that lead to cavities.

Using a straw. A study at Temple University in Philadelphia discovered that you can minimize damage to healthy teeth by sipping that soda through a straw.

Dental sealants. To prevent tooth decay, many dentists recommend dental sealants, a protective coating that’s applied to the surface of the back teeth.

Good oral and dental hygiene can help you avoid cavities and tooth decay, but these six cavity fighters will also make sure your mouth is as clean and healthy as possible in between dental checkups.

For further information regarding cavity prevention, call Dr. Leo J. Kituskie, DMD for an appointment today at (302) 994-4900. Visit our website to learn more at implantperiocare.com.

Dr. Leo J. Kituskie proudly serves Wilmington and all surrounding areas.

Bad Things Come in Sets of Three | Wilmington Dentist

If there is anything we try to do at all times, it’s look after our health. But the one aspect of our health we tend to forget is our oral health. Unfortunately, our oral health is very important to our health overall. If you’ve recently been told that you have gum disease, you are not alone. It’s been estimated that nearly 75% of Americans have some form of gum disease.

But how do we get gum disease anyway? Gum disease is caused by bacteria found in plaque, the sticky colorless film that forms on your teeth. If this plaque isn’t removed by preforming proper oral hygiene habits, plaque will build up and the bacteria will infect every aspect of your mouth. There are three stages of gum disease: gingivitis, periodontitis and advanced periodontitis. Let’s take a look at each and how your mouth will be affected…

Gingivitis. This is the inflammation of your gums and teeth that’s caused by plaque buildup at your gum line. This is the only stage of gum disease that can be reversed, since the bone and connective tissue are not yet affected.

Periodontitis. Once periodontitis occurs, the supporting bone and tissues structures are irreversibly damaged. Your gums will start to form pockets below your gum line, which traps plaque and food.

Advanced Periodontitis. This is the final stage of gum disease, where the tissue structures and supporting bones are destroyed, which can cause you teeth to shift and loosen, affecting your bite.